The 3 LOCKHART Brothers , Ernest Stanley, Clarence Melville and Albert Allison MM, served in Egypt and on the Western Front during the Great War 1914 – 1918. The 2 older boys were born in Victoria, at Ballan and Blakeville, whilst the youngest  was born at Jarrahdale, WA. These birth towns were well known Timber Mill towns, which demonstrates that their father, Thomas Martin LOCKHART was dependent on the Timber industry for his employment.  The brothers War Service History is detailed below in Date of Enlistment order.

( 1 ) – LOCKHART, Ernest Stanley- 942 – Driver – 12th Field Artillery Brigade AIF

Ernest LOCKHART was 24 years of age, and working as a Labourer , when he enlisted for War Service at Blackboy Hill Camp, WA on 10 September, 1914. He embarked Fremantle, WA on 2 November 1914 aboard the troop transport ship ” Medic “, bound for Alexandria, Egypt. Once disembarked in Suez, he was stationed at the Overseas Training Base at Ghezireh, for advanced training from 26 November 1914.

Pte. LOCKHART was appointed to ” H ” Company of the 12th Battalion as a Driver on 1 January, 1915, however 4 weeks later, he was struck down with a severe  attack of Pneumonia, being diagnosed as dangerously ill. He spent 4 weeks undergoing treatment and convalescence at the No. 2 Australian General Hospital at Mena, Ghezireh, Egypt. On 10 May 1915, he was transferred to the Transport Section at Mex Camp, Alexandria, where he was to spend the next 6 months.

On 3 November, 1915 Driver LOCKHART was transferred to Maadi Camp, Egypt where he was initially hospitalised for 7 days, suffering from Tonsilitis and Catarrh. Short term transfers to the 52nd Battalion at Railhead, Egypt and the 24th Howitzer Brigade at Tel-el-Kebir as a Gunner, preceded his appointment as a Temporary Driver at Serapeum 0n 18 April, 1916.

Ernest joined the British Expeditionary Forces at Alexandria to embark for Marseilles, France, where he was appointed Driver for the 24th Field Artillery Brigade in the field in France on 1 July, 1916. After more than 6 months at this posting, Driver LOCKHART was transferred to the 12th Field Artillery Battery on 25 January, 1917. He spent a continuous 8 months in the field in France and Belgium as a Driver with the 12th FAB, before being granted 2 weeks leave to the United Kingdom on 21 September, 1917. He rejoined the Unit in Belgium before being re-located to France, where he quickly suffered the impact of Trench Fever over a week, then served unscathed for the next 5 months.

On 7 March, 1918, Driver LOCKHART was admitted to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France suffering from Appendicitis. He then suffered a recurrence of Trench Fever, which caused his evacuation to England on 24 March, 1918, when he was admitted to Clandon Park Military Hospital ( Royal Herbert ) at Woolwich. He endured a 7 week recovery period, followed by 2 weeks English Leave.

Driver LOCKHART returned from leave to the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, before being sent to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England. He was undergoing training, in preparation for return to service on the Western Front, when inflicted with a bout of Influenza. Ernest was admitted to the Devonport Military Hospital on 15 August, 1918 and spent 2 months under treatment and convalescence , when further English Leave was approved, prior to his return to Australia.

Driver Ernest Stanley LOCKHART embarked from England on 21 December, 1918 aboard the troop transport ship ” Miltiades “, bound for Australia. He disembarked at Fremantle, WA on 31 January, 1919 before being discharged from Active Service on 1 April, 1919.

Service Medals Awarded

1914/15 Star – No. 2384

British War Medal – No. 331

Victory Medal – No. 330

Ernest, and his brothers, Clarence and Albert each served in Egypt and the Western Front for over-lapping periods, so it is possible that the 3 were able to meet as a group, on occasions.

( 2 ) – LOCKHART, Clarence Melville – 4065 – Pte. – 11th Battalion AIF

Clarence was 23 years of age and working as a Horse Driver when he enlisted for War Service at Blackboy Hill Camp, WA on 18 September, 1915. He was appointed to ” D ” Company of the 11th Battalion for initial training, before embarking from Fremantle, WA on the troop transport ship ” Mongolia “, bound for Alexandria, Egypt.

On 14 December, 1915 Pte. LOCKHART arrived at the Overseas Training Base at Ghezireh for advanced training. Unfortunately on the second day in camp, he was taken ill, and admitted to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Abbassia for 2 weeks treatment and convalescence. He recovered to resume training at Ghezireh for 6 weeks, until an attack of Tonsilitis saw him re-admitted to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Heliopolis. He was then discharged for duty at the Garrison Camp at Zeitoun, Egypt for 4 weeks, before embarking from Alexandria to land in Marseilles, France on 4 April, 1916.

Clarence LOCKHART suffered from a Skin Disease shortly after arrival in France, and spent almost 4 months moving between  the 1st Australian Base Depot at Etaples and the nearby 26th General Hospital. It was not until 30 July, 1916 that he received a Medical Clearance to rejoin the 11th Battalion in the field in France. He served the ensuing 5 months in continuous trench warfare, initially at Pozieres, France before moving on to Ypres, Belgium.

On 23 December, 1916 Pte. LOCKHART was admitted to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples, France suffering from Diarrhoea/Dysentry. He was not responding appropriately to treatment, so was evacuated and admitted to the University War Dysentry Depot in England, where he remained for 3 months. He was discharged on 3 April, 1917 to take advantage of English Leave. He resumed duty at the Hurdcott Command Depot, then appointed to the Drafting Depot at Perham Downs. Clarence then embarked from Southampton bound for the 1st Australian Base Depot at Havre, France.

Pte. LOCKHART rejoined the 11th Battalion in the field in France on 17 June, 1917, serving continuously until 1 November 1917, when he suffered a gunshot wound to the left thigh.  He was treated at the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station, before admittance to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France. After 2 weeks at Rouen, Clarence was evacuated to the 5th Southern General Hospital Portsmouth, England. Clarence underwent an additional 4 months treatment and convalescence before being discharged to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth.

Pte. Clarence Melville LOCKHART did not return to action, embarking from England on the troop transport ship ” Boonah “, bound for Australia. He disembarked at Fremantle, WA on 11 September 1918, prior to being discharged from active service on 7 October, 1918.

Service Medals Awarded

1914/15 Star – No. 381

British War Medal – No. 7370

Victory Medal – No. 7341.

 

( 3 )- LOCKHART, Albert Allison  MM – 4064 – Sapper – 1st Division Signal Corps AIF

Albert was 20 years of age and working as a Farrier in Bunbury when he enlisted for War Service on 6 July, 1915. He was allotted to the 9th Reinforcements of the 10th Light Horse Regiment at Blackboy Hill Camp, WA and subsequently transferred to the 10th Reinforcements on 1 September 1915. Pte. Lockhart was subjected to a further transfer to the 13th Reinforcements of the 11th Battalion. He then transferred to ” D ” Company of the 11th Battalion before embarking from Fremantle , on the troop transport ship ” Mongolia ” on 23 November, 1915 bound for Alexandria, Egypt.

He disembarked at Alexandria on 14 December, 1915 to the Overseas Training Base at Ghezireh, to undertake advanced training. On 19 February, 1916 , Albert transferred to the Garrison Camp at Zeitoun, Egypt for 2 weeks, prior to embarking for Marseilles, France where he landed on 5 April, 1916.

Pte. LOCKHART suffered a severe gunshot wound to a knee during action in France on 22 July, 1916 and was admitted to the 23rd General Hospital at Etaples. Due to the extent of the injury, Albert was required to be evacuated and admitted to the King George Hospital Stanford Street London England. He underwent 3 months of intensive treatment and convalescence before being granted English Leave. After taking leave, he was admitted to the 3rd Australian General Hospital, Brighton, England on 29 January, 1917 where he remained for a further 2 months.

On 23 March, 1917, Pte. LOCKHART was transferred to the newly formed 70th Battalion at Windmill Hill, Wareham England. He was re-transferred to the 11th Battalion on 19 September, 1917 before embarking from Southampton on 9 October, 1917 and joining his unit in the field in France a week later. Albert served 3 months in the trenches in France and Belgium, before being detached to the Infantry School in France, for 4 weeks specialist training. Following this detachment, he rejoined his Unit in the field in France.

On 17 March, 1918 Pte. LOCKHART was transferred to the 1st Australian Division Signal Company as a Sapper, where he was to serve a continuous 7 month period in France. During this period, Albert was involved in action which earnt him the award of a MILITARY MEDAL ” On the night 17/18 September 1918 and throughout operations on 18 September at JEANCOURT this linesman maintained continuous communications from right group Headquarters, both to the front, flanks and rear under constant shell fire. This linesman spent the whole of 20 hours continually on the lines and by his devotion to duty, communications were uninterrupted the whole of the operation “. 

Albert proceeded on English Leave 0n 21 October, 1918 and did not return to action on the Western Front. He was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England on 27 February, 1919, where he remained, until embarking from England on the troop transport ship ” Suffolk “, bound for Australia.

Sapper Albert Allison LOCKHART MM disembarked in Australia on 31 May, 1919, being discharged from War Service on 7 August, 1919. Albert died on 25 April, 1971 at the age of 76 years and is buried in the Karrakatta, WA cemetery.

 

Service Medals Awarded

1914/15 Star – No. 380

British War Medal – No. 7369

Victory Medal – No. 7340

Military Medal

 

Author’s Comment

The 3 LOCKHART brothers, Ernest Stanley, Clarence Melville and Albert Allison MM, all safely returned to Australia following their War Service. This outcome was an unlikely achievement, considering the extent of the National casualty rate. Even so,  the brothers suffered their fair share of hospitalisations and gunshot wounds.

Clarence and Albert served together in ” D ” Company of the 11th Battalion in Egypt and on the Western Front in France throughout 1916. Ernest’s service locations with the Field Artillery Battery overlapped his brother’s locations  on a few occasions. During 1917, Clarence and Albert both spent some months in English Hospitals, but it is not known whether they were able to meet during this period. It appears that when Clarence suffered a gunshot wound on 1 November 1917, his joint service with Albert in the 11th Battalion was terminated.

It is probable that Ernest and Clarence may have met between late March, 1918 and July, 1918 during their stays in English Hospitals for treatment and convalescence, prior to their posting to Command Depots.

The Author is keen to publish any confirmed details of the LOCKHART brothers meeting during their War Service postings in the Great War of 1914 – 1918.